Pop Culture With A Metal Filter. Take a look at the world of pop culture through the eyes of heavy metal fans. Music, movies, comics, video games, TV shows, fashion, drinks, sports, toys, etc.

National Lager Day is Dec 10. Some tips from Samuel Adams

 

6569

This year marked another great one for craft beer. Not only did volume continue to grow into the many millions of barrels, but craft beer lovers saw the rise of barrel-aged brews (barrel aging not just for wine and liquor anymore), sour ales and craft beer in cans. What better way to celebrate the past year than tomorrow on National Lager Day.

Below please find more fun facts and reasons to drink craft lager on National Lager Day and a recent survey conducted by Wakefield Research, which found Americans had this to say about beer:

  • Get the Beer Right for National Lager Day: Survey: Majority Don’t Know the Difference Between an Ale and a Lager

When preparing for your National Lager Day celebration, make sure you’re actually stocking your fridge with craft brews that are lagers. 63% of Americans don’t know the difference between an ale and a lager.

  • Gen Y’ers won’t hesitate to give you a side-eye if you order the wrong beer. Nearly 1 in 3 (32%) Americans ages 21-34 have judged someone because of their choice in beer. So be sure to make the right pick on National Lager Day – a craft lager like Samuel Adams Boston Lager is a great option.
  • Men are much more likely than women to shun you if they disagree with your taste in beer. 1 in 4 (25%) American men have judged someone because of their choice in beer, compared to only 15% of American women. Be sure to keep quality in mind when ordering – you can’t go wrong with a quality craft brew.

 

Top 5 National Lager Day Facts to Impress Your Friends (from our friends at Samuel Adams)

1. Though beer has been brewed for over seven millennia, the first lager wasn’t brewed until the 16th century. America’s first lager was brewed in 1838, when Bavarian brewmaster John Wagner brought lager yeast across the pond from Europe.

2. Let’s talk science: lager yeast, as opposed to ale yeast, ferments (eats sugar to produce carbonation and alcohol) at cooler temperatures and, when done fermenting, settles to the bottom of the fermentation tank.

3. Lager yeast also takes a longer time to condition the beer than ale yeast. What’s the tradeoff for the additional weeks of waiting for a lager to brew? In the case of our Samuel Adams Boston Lager, it’s the extra hop in the aroma and smooth, refreshing finish.

4. Due in part to their clean, crisp character, lagers are sometimes labeled plain and boring. That couldn’t be farther from the truth! Craft lagers are flavorful and complex, and a number of different styles fall under the lager category. These include Oktoberfest, Baltic porter, Vienna lager, bock, double bock, wheat bock and rauchbier, among many others.

5. Before modern refrigeration, brewers needed a way to keep their lagers cool during the brewing process. In lieu of today’s larger cooling tanks, German lager brewers of old sometimes cooled their beer in Alpine caves or in cellars dug deeply into hillsides.

*National Lager Day Facts compiled by the brewers at Samuel Adams

 


 

6569a

 


 

Jim Koch’s Top 10 Reasons to Drink a Craft Lager on National Lager Day

 

1. The first beer I ever brewed was a lager. In fact, the beer I eventually named Samuel Adams Boston Lager was brewed in my kitchen in 1984 from an old recipe dating to the 1860s, handed down by my great-great grandfather, Louis Koch. In his day, this brew was called Louis Koch Lager.

 

2. Ales have been brewed and celebrated for over seven millennia…they’ve had their time to shine! Lagers are relatively new to the beer scene, first appearing in Bavaria during the 16th century and in America around 1840. Craft brewers only began brewing lagers towards the end of the 20th century, so today’s the day to give craft lagers their due.

 

3. It was a lager that helped kick-start the American craft beer revolution. In 1985, Samuel Adams Boston Lager was named “The Best Beer in America” in the Consumer Preference Poll at the Great American Beer Festival in Denver. Boston Lager’s popularity helped revive America’s passion for full-bodied brews with robust and rich character.

 

4. In a recent survey conducted by Wakefield Research for Sam Adams, 63% of Americans didn’t know the difference between a lager and an ale. There’s no better way to learn than through real-life experimentation!

 

5. Due in part to their clean, crisp character, lagers are sometimes mistakenly labeled as plain and boring by beginner craft beer drinkers. That couldn’t be farther from the truth! Craft lagers are flavorful and complex, and a number of different styles fall under the lager category. These include Oktoberfest, Baltic porter, Vienna lager, bock, double bock, wheat bock and rauchbier, among many others.

 

6. Brewing yeast fall into two categories, ale yeast and lager yeast, and ferment in different ways. Lager yeast takes a longer time to ferment and condition than ale yeast, extending the brewing process by weeks and sometimes months. But as the saying goes, good things come to those who wait. What’s the tradeoff for the additional weeks of waiting for a lager to brew? In the case of our Samuel Adams Boston Lager, it’s the extra hop in the aroma and smooth, refreshing finish.

 

7.  Upon their introduction to the U.S., lagers took America by storm and temporarily pushed out popular ale styles like porters and stouts. Massive waves of German immigrants to America in the mid-1800s brought an influx of lager drinkers. As lagers began to replace ales, Americans couldn’t get enough!

 

For more about National Lager Day, Boston Lager and Samuel Adams, visit: http://www.samueladams.com/

Leave a Reply